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Home Sacred Places Regional North America Mystery Hill North Carolina
Mystery Hill North Carolina

Mystery Hill North Carolina

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North_America>United_States>North_Carolina>Caldwell>Blowing Rock>Mystery Hill North Carolina
   
   
       
       
Continent.::.
North_America
Type.::.
Paranormal
Country.::.
United_States
Hits.::.
2389
State.::.
North_Carolina
Fees.::.
Admission Rates Adults: $8.00 Children: $6.00 Seniors: $7.00 Four and Under Free
County.::.
Caldwell
Hours.::.
7 days a week, rain, snow or shine! June-August: 8am-8pm September-May: 9am-5pm
City.::.
Blowing Rock  
Elevation.::.
3368 ft  
Latitude.::.
36097861N  
Longitude.::.
8138637W    

The History of Mystery Hill.
In 1957, Buford Stamey and Rondia J. Underwood were looking for land to build a fish-camp type restreaunt on, and came across Mystery Hill. In 1958, they were invited back for a private tour by the owner at that time, William Hudson.

Throughout the tour, Mr. Hudson explained about the mountain side. It seemed that the gravitational pull on the side of the mountain cause unusual things to happen. Mr. Hudson operated a cider mill on an old wooden platform. Identical twins worked on the mill and no matter how they stood, the twin on the north end always looked taller! Hence, the Mystery Platform was discovered. You can experience the same illusion today. The second phenomenon was Mr. Hudson's apple trees. The trees in the orchard grew towards the north, directly into the prevailing winds. Mr Hudson pointed out a path through the apple orchard which was crooked for no apparent reason. He had built the path, but to his amazement found himself being pulled onto the old path time time and time again. Even the apples fell and collected on the old, crooked path, but not on the new, straighter path. In 1948, while reading a LIFE magazine, Mr. Hudson found an article about a strange place in California which had somilar peculiarities. The Hudsons' visited the site and spent several days researching. When they returned to Boone, the first Mystery House was built.

Aside from the house, Mr. Hudson also added a museum that included antiques, a blacksmith and cobbler shop and household items. This was the birth of what was to be known later as the Appalachian Heritage Museum. Mr. Rondia Underwood purchased the entire operation in 1958. Admission was 50 cents for adults and 25 cents for children. In 1960 the souvenir shop was enlarged and in 1963 a sandwich shop was added. A devestating fire occurred in 1963 and destroyed everything except the Mystery House and Grandpa's Cabin. Within three weeks Mystery Hill's doors were reopened. Throughout the 1960's and 70's the business thrived. In 1974 a new souvenir and sanwich shop was built. In 1980, with new additions and improvements Mystery Hill began operating year round as a good family entertainment center. In 1989 another devastating fire destroyed almost everything. Amazingly, the Mystery House was again not touched by fire. Determined to keep the family attraction operating, the Underwoods re-opened the next day while other buildings were smoldering around them.

Today, over 50 years old, Mystery Hill is still open and growing. The current facility includes the original Mystery Platform, the Mystery House, Hall of Mystery, the Native American Artifacts Museum, and the Appalachian Heritage Museum (also known as the Dougherty House). This information was obtained from Mystery Hill's Brochure.

http://www.mysteryhill-nc.com


Mystery Hill was named after a hill which has an unusually strong northern gravitational pull. This phenomenon supposedly causes mysterious things to happen.



   
   

Located on US Highway 321 Between Boone and Blowing Rock, NC

Restrooms, No Wheelchair Access

Mystery Hill :: 129 Mystery Hill Lane :: Blowing Rock, NC 28605 :: 828.264.2792 :: mysteryhill-nc.com


 

Of Course, the main attraction at Mystery Hill is The Mystery House, where there is a stronger than average pull to the north which causes some of our basic laws of physics to work differently than normal. Stand at a 45? angle, watch a ball roll up hill, see water flow up hill and try other fascinating experiments! Come feel the power of Mystery Hill's gravitational anomaly! What causes this unexplained pull? You'll find a hall full of puzzles, hands-on experiments and optical illusions at The Hall of Mystery. Exhibits are based on physics and other science and math theories. Leave your shadow on the wall and at the Bubble-Rama exhibit, encapsulate a friend in a bubble. The Spooky Spigot, Magic Lightbulb, Hologram and The Flying Mirror are all in the Hall of Mystery. You'll enjoy the Hall of Mystery where you'll find exhibits that make you take a second look and realize that seeing is believing! The Dougherty Brothers, D.D. and B.B., founders of Appalachian State University, called it their home. It was built on 150 acres donated by their father for the purpose of building a school to further the education of mountain children. It was the first house in the county to have electricity and running water. It is now used to portray life in the late 1800's to early 1900's of middle class mountain families. During their honeymoon, R.E. "Moon" Mullins and his lovely new bride, Irene, began the collection with three arrowheads found in Carersville, Georgia. By 1987, when "Moon" passed away, their collection had blossomed in thousands of pieces. Housing over 50,000 pieces of authentic Native American artifacts is The Native American Artifacts Museum. Almost every time period of American Indian history is represented in this fascinating exhibit that took over 70 years to collect. From arrowheads and effigy pipes to bowls, celts and awls, this is one of the largest collections of its kind in North Carolina.



 




The History of Mystery Hill. In 1957, Buford Stamey and Rondia J. Underwood were looking for land to build a fish-camp type restreaunt on, and came across Mystery Hill. In 1958, they were invited back for a private tour by the owner at that time, William Hudson. Throughout the tour, Mr. Hudson explained about the mountain side. It seemed that the gravitational pull on the side of the mountain cause unusual things to happen. Mr. Hudson operated a cider mill on an old wooden platform. Identical twins worked on the mill and no matter how they stood, the twin on the north end always looked taller! Hence, the Mystery Platform was discovered. You can experience the same illusion today. The second phenomenon was Mr. Hudson's apple trees. The trees in the orchard grew towards the north, directly into the prevailing winds. Mr Hudson pointed out a path through the apple orchard which was crooked for no apparent reason. He had built the path, but to his amazement found himself being pulled onto the old path time time and time again. Even the apples fell and collected on the old, crooked path, but not on the new, straighter path. In 1948, while reading a LIFE magazine, Mr. Hudson found an article about a strange place in California which had somilar peculiarities. The Hudsons' visited the site and spent several days researching. When they returned to Boone, the first Mystery House was built. Aside from the house, Mr. Hudson also added a museum that included antiques, a blacksmith and cobbler shop and household items. This was the birth of what was to be known later as the Appalachian Heritage Museum. Mr. Rondia Underwood purchased the entire operation in 1958. Admission was 50 cents for adults and 25 cents for children. In 1960 the souvenir shop was enlarged and in 1963 a sandwich shop was added. A devestating fire occurred in 1963 and destroyed everything except the Mystery House and Grandpa's Cabin. Within three weeks Mystery Hill's doors were reopened. Throughout the 1960's and 70's the business thrived. In 1974 a new souvenir and sanwich shop was built. In 1980, with new additions and improvements Mystery Hill began operating year round as a good family entertainment center. In 1989 another devastating fire destroyed almost everything. Amazingly, the Mystery House was again not touched by fire. Determined to keep the family attraction operating, the Underwoods re-opened the next day while other buildings were smoldering around them. Today, over 50 years old, Mystery Hill is still open and growing. The current facility includes the original Mystery Platform, the Mystery House, Hall of Mystery, the Native American Artifacts Museum, and the Appalachian Heritage Museum (also known as the Dougherty House). This information was obtained from Mystery Hill's Brochure.
 

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