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Heavener Runestone

Heavener Runestone

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Heavener  
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The Mystery of the Heavener Runestone



In a hollow on Poteau Mountain near Heavener, Oklahoma, there is a state park that holds a mystery. A mystery that many have tried to explain. A mystery etched in the face of a large slab of stone which stands 12 feet tall, 10 feet wide, and 16 inches thick. For years, locals called it "Indian Rock."






Today, it is known as the Heavener Runestone. Gloria Farley, who dedicated over 33 years of research to the stone, says is solved. Farley says the letters on the stone are actually Scandinavian runes and translated means "Gnomel's Valley."


Gloria Farley
She believes Norsemen traveled to the Americas across the Atlantic, explored up the Mississippi, Arkansas and Poteau Rivers centuries before Columbus, establishing a site near the present-day Oklahoma town.
Farley pushed for the establishment of a state park which came into existence in 1970, and which now protects the site.



Now another theory from another Oklahoman is causing some scholars to reconsider the strange etchings on the monument-like stone. Dr. Lee W. Woodard, a minister from Sallisaw, has written a book entitled "Secret La Salle Monument and Historical Marker" which explains that the Heavener, Oklahoma Runestone is in fact a monument made between 1687 - 1688 by Gemme Hiens,,who was the German - English companion of the famous French explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle.


Lee Woodard




Woodard calls the monument a linguistic, artistic, and mathematical engineering masterpiece that honors La Salle by encoding his birth and death dates. He also writes that the carvings tell the location on the Poteau River where the famous explorer was assassinated.






In his book, Woodard tells the story of how he made the discovery, and relates the placement of La Salle's death to historical accounts, and that this new knowledge enables a much better study of Native American society.



To read an article on the La Salle monument written by Woodard exclusively for kotv.com, click here.

The La Salle Monument web site contains photos and information on how to order Woodard's book. www.lasallemonument.com


A Local Legend
According to local oral history, the tall stone was discovered by a Choctaw hunting party sometime in the 1830's. Records tell us there was no underbrush on the mountain then. A deer could be seen for a distance under the virgin timber. White men came into the area during the 1870's. Wilson King and two other trappers supposedly saw the etched stone before 1874, according to a statement signed by King's son.



However, the earliest eyewitness report recorded is from Luther Capps, who saw the stone in 1898. Logging was an industry when Heavener was established in 1894. Laura Callahan remembered in 1904 that at the young age of five, her father and local sawmill owner R.L. Bailey, held her up to the stone, and she rubbed her hands over the mossy lettering.


In 1913, when Carl F. Kemmerer found again found the stone, and described it to citizens in Heavener, he found that others already knew of the monument-like stele which was called "Indian Rock."



At the time, no one knew that the Native Americans had no written alphabets. In 1923, the lettering was submitted by Kemmerer to the Smithsonian Institution, who identified the letters as Norse runes.


Farley says the answer is "In Plain Sight"



In 1948, research to translate the etched letters on the stone, when they were made, and by whom, was begun by Gloria Stewart Farley. She had seen the inscription as a child. Farley says she spent a total of 38 years finding the answers to these questions.





She renamed it The Heavener Runestone in 1951. In 1965, Mr. Herbert Ward and family donated the 55 acres on which the Runestone State Park was built with legislative funding received due to the efforts of State of Oklahoma. Based on Farley's research, the Runestone State Park came into existence to preserve the stone in 1970.



By 1967 the runes were believed to represent the date of November 11, 1012 with the runes used as numbers in a Norse cryptopuzzle, according to Alf Monge, a cryptanalyst who was born in Norway. The authenticity of the stone being made by ancient Vikings was supported by the finding of two more runestones in the vicinity of Poteau Mountain, another smaller inscription of eight runes at a foothill of Cavanal Mountain, 14 miles away, and another stone bearing five runes at Shawnee, Oklahoma.

In 1986, it was found that these five rune stones had apparently been made even two or three centuries earlier, before 800 A.D. Dr. Richard Nielson, whose doctorate was obtained at the University of Denmark, found translated the symbols into words instead of numbers. By making an in-depth study of the ancient literature and hundreds of Scandinavian runestones, he determined that the second and eighth runes are actually variants of the letter L, which permitted him to say that the Heavener runes are G-L-O-M-E-D-A-L, meaning Glome's Valley, a land claim. The similar Poteau runes are a memorial to the same man meaning, "Magic or protection to Gloie (his nickname)". The Shawnee rune stone is the name MEDOK, and was probably a gravestone, but had been moved because of construction work. The other two rune stones near Poteau Mountain do not have enough runes for a translation, but the four stones were placed in a straight line, miles apart. These five inscriptions are all from the oldest 24-rune Futhark alphabet, in use from 300 to 800 A.D. in Scandinavia.

It is believed that these Norse explorers crossed the Atlantic, rounded the tip of Florida into the Gulf of Mexico, found the Mississippi River, and sailed into its tributaries, the Arkansas and Poteau Rivers, around 750 A.D. This date is indicated by the grammar used on the Poteau Rune stone.

To read Farley's exclusive response to Woodard's theory, click here.

Visit Farley's website to see special extracts and ordering information about her book.

The site also has many links to web pages dedicated to the theories of Old World ancients traveling and visiting the Americas.

The Heavener Runestone State Park is located two and a half miles northeast of Heavener, off Highway 59 and US Highway 270.



For more information, contact:
Heavener Runestone State Park Route 1, Box 1510 Heavener, OK 74937 918-653-2241/Park Office

Features/Facilities:

* 55 Park Acres
* Ancient Runestone Hieroglyphics
* Playground
* Nature trail
* Gift Shop

http://www.kotv.com/okt/runestones.asp






   
   






 



 




The Mystery of the Heavener Runestone In a hollow on Poteau Mountain near Heavener, Oklahoma, there is a state park that holds a mystery. A mystery that many have tried to explain. A mystery etched in the face of a large slab of stone which stands 12 feet tall, 10 feet wide, and 16 inches thick. For years, locals called it "Indian Rock." Today, it is known as the Heavener Runestone. Gloria Farley, who dedicated over 33 years of research to the stone, says is solved. Farley says the letters on the stone are actually Scandinavian runes and translated means "Gnomel's Valley." Gloria Farley She believes Norsemen traveled to the Americas across the Atlantic, explored up the Mississippi, Arkansas and Poteau Rivers centuries before Columbus, establishing a site near the present-day Oklahoma town. Farley pushed for the establishment of a state park which came into existence in 1970, and which now protects the site. Now another theory from another Oklahoman is causing some scholars to reconsider the strange etchings on the monument-like stone. Dr. Lee W. Woodard, a minister from Sallisaw, has written a book entitled "Secret La Salle Monument and Historical Marker" which explains that the Heavener, Oklahoma Runestone is in fact a monument made between 1687 - 1688 by Gemme Hiens,,who was the German - English companion of the famous French explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle. Lee Woodard Woodard calls the monument a linguistic, artistic, and mathematical engineering masterpiece that honors La Salle by encoding his birth and death dates. He also writes that the carvings tell the location on the Poteau River where the famous explorer was assassinated. In his book, Woodard tells the story of how he made the discovery, and relates the placement of La Salle's death to historical accounts, and that this new knowledge enables a much better study of Native American society. To read an article on the La Salle monument written by Woodard exclusively for kotv.com, click here. The La Salle Monument web site contains photos and information on how to order Woodard's book. www.lasallemonument.com A Local Legend According to local oral history, the tall stone was discovered by a Choctaw hunting party sometime in the 1830's. Records tell us there was no underbrush on the mountain then. A deer could be seen for a distance under the virgin timber. White men came into the area during the 1870's. Wilson King and two other trappers supposedly saw the etched stone before 1874, according to a statement signed by King's son. However, the earliest eyewitness report recorded is from Luther Capps, who saw the stone in 1898. Logging was an industry when Heavener was established in 1894. Laura Callahan remembered in 1904 that at the young age of five, her father and local sawmill owner R.L. Bailey, held her up to the stone, and she rubbed her hands over the mossy lettering. In 1913, when Carl F. Kemmerer found again found the stone, and described it to citizens in Heavener, he found that others already knew of the monument-like stele which was called "Indian Rock." At the time, no one knew that the Native Americans had no written alphabets. In 1923, the lettering was submitted by Kemmerer to the Smithsonian Institution, who identified the letters as Norse runes. Farley says the answer is "In Plain Sight" In 1948, research to translate the etched letters on the stone, when they were made, and by whom, was begun by Gloria Stewart Farley. She had seen the inscription as a child. Farley says she spent a total of 38 years finding the answers to these questions. She renamed it The Heavener Runestone in 1951. In 1965, Mr. Herbert Ward and family donated the 55 acres on which the Runestone State Park was built with legislative funding received due to the efforts of State of Oklahoma. Based on Farley's research, the Runestone State Park came into existence to preserve the stone in 1970. By 1967 the runes were believed to represent the date of November 11, 1012 with the runes used as numbers in a Norse cryptopuzzle, according to Alf Monge, a cryptanalyst who was born in Norway. The authenticity of the stone being made by ancient Vikings was supported by the finding of two more runestones in the vicinity of Poteau Mountain, another smaller inscription of eight runes at a foothill of Cavanal Mountain, 14 miles away, and another stone bearing five runes at Shawnee, Oklahoma. In 1986, it was found that these five rune stones had apparently been made even two or three centuries earlier, before 800 A.D. Dr. Richard Nielson, whose doctorate was obtained at the University of Denmark, found translated the symbols into words instead of numbers. By making an in-depth study of the ancient literature and hundreds of Scandinavian runestones, he determined that the second and eighth runes are actually variants of the letter L, which permitted him to say that the Heavener runes are G-L-O-M-E-D-A-L, meaning Glome's Valley, a land claim. The similar Poteau runes are a memorial to the same man meaning, "Magic or protection to Gloie (his nickname)". The Shawnee rune stone is the name MEDOK, and was probably a gravestone, but had been moved because of construction work. The other two rune stones near Poteau Mountain do not have enough runes for a translation, but the four stones were placed in a straight line, miles apart. These five inscriptions are all from the oldest 24-rune Futhark alphabet, in use from 300 to 800 A.D. in Scandinavia. It is believed that these Norse explorers crossed the Atlantic, rounded the tip of Florida into the Gulf of Mexico, found the Mississippi River, and sailed into its tributaries, the Arkansas and Poteau Rivers, around 750 A.D. This date is indicated by the grammar used on the Poteau Rune stone. To read Farley's exclusive response to Woodard's theory, click here. Visit Farley's website to see special extracts and ordering information about her book. The site also has many links to web pages dedicated to the theories of Old World ancients traveling and visiting the Americas. The Heavener Runestone State Park is located two and a half miles northeast of Heavener, off Highway 59 and US Highway 270. For more information, contact: Heavener Runestone State Park Route 1, Box 1510 Heavener, OK 74937 918-653-2241/Park Office Features/Facilities: * 55 Park Acres * Ancient Runestone Hieroglyphics * Playground * Nature trail * Gift Shop
 

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